Dental Hygiene

Dental Hygiene

9 Tips To Keep Your Children’s Teeth Healthy

Tags: , , Dental Education, Dental Hygiene, Uncategorized
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No kid enjoys sitting in a dentist’s chair with an adult’s latex-gloved hands in their tiny mouth. Cavities always prolong the experience, and often include some scary instruments that would make anyone cringe. The best way to keep your child’s dental visits as quick and painless – and to keep their smiles healthy as they grow up – is to help your child to develop healthy habits early on. These 9 tips, along with regular brushing, flossing, and dental checkups, will help you do just that.

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5 Essential Dental Health Tips for Seniors

Tags: , , Blog, Dental Education, Dental Hygiene
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By the time we’re 60+, we know that brushing and flossing twice a day, visiting a dentist regularly, and eating nutritious foods are all essential components of good oral health. These healthy habits become even more important as we age, when conditions that affect our mouth may also affect our entire body.

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Everything You Need To Know About Toothpaste

Tags: , , , Dental Education, Dental Hygiene, Teeth Whitening
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We know that daily brushing lays the foundation for healthy teeth (along with flossing and regular dental visits, of course). But shopping for toothpaste can be overwhelming. Entire aisles are devoted to the many iterations of this seemingly-simple tooth-cleaning gel in grocery stores, drug stores, and just about every other kind of store. With all of these potential choices, it’s easy to get confused.

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What Causes Dry Mouth?

Tags: , , Dental Education, Dental Hygiene, Dry Mouth
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Dry mouth or Xerostomia is a condition when the amount of saliva present in the mouth is reduced. This reduction can vary from a little to a lot to the total loss of saliva. The amount of saliva a normal person produces during the day is about 2 cups. The ability of a patient to detect a decrease in saliva is when the volume of saliva decreases about 50%, or down to one cup.

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Brush Off Prostate Woes

Tags: , , , , Blog, Data & Facts, Dental Hygiene, News, Prostate
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Gum Disease has already been linked to heart disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. Now research from Case Western Reserve University suggests a connection between periodontal and prostate health. Study author Nabil Bissada, DDS, speculates that reducing inflammation in the mouth by brushing and flossing regularly may also reduce prostate inflammation

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Periodontal Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease

Tags: , , , , , Alzheimer’s Disease, Blog, Data & Facts, Dental Education, Dental Hygiene, News
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Dental researchers at the New York University College of Dentistry have found the first long-term evidence that periodontal disease may increase associated with Alzheimer’s disease in healthy individuals, as well as in those who already are cognitively impaired. The NYU study offers fresh evidence that gingival inflammation may contribute to brain inflammation, neurodegeneration, and Alzheimer’s disease.

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Respiratory Bacteria in Oral Biofilm and Saliva

Tags: , , , , Blog, Data & Facts, Dental Education, Dental Hygiene, News, Respiratory Fluid, Timeline
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Oral bacterial biofilm contains an estimated 700 species including oral as well as respiratory pathogens. Poor oral hygiene and periodontal disease provide and inflammatory condition and biofilm environment conducive to the proliferation of respiratory pathogens. The risk of nosocomial pneumonia may be increased in hospitalized patients as the biofilm provides a reservoir for pathogenic species. Clinical Implications: Oral hygiene for hospitalized, intubated patients should be considered not only for oral health, but also to prevent aspiration of bacteria into the lungs.

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Periodontitis and Birth Control Pills

Tags: , , , , Birth Control, Blog, Data & Facts, Dental Education, Dental Hygiene, Periodontal Disease, Timeline
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Oral contraceptive use is linked to increased gingival inflammation due to an increase in the concentration of sex hormones in the gingival tissues. Newer formulations of oral contraceptives contain lower levels of hormones; however the number of years taking the drug may influence gingival conditions.

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